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All the latest NGAC news.

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    Cork’s Black Jerseys and Remembrance

    Matt O’DonnellNashville Gaelic Athletic Club Public Relations Officer News emerged this week that both the Cork hurlers and footballers will take the pitch in their home Allianz League matches with Limerick and Derry, respectively, wearing special black jerseys with red accents designed by the Cork GAA county board. Those participating in Gaelic games abroad may […]

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    Updates

    AGM and Holiday Party 2019 Wrap-Up

    Well, one more year of hurling and Gaelic football in Nashville is on the books. We now look forward to 2019 with excitement and a nearly new board! Here’s what went down at our year-end meeting: Officer Elections Your new board members for 2019 are: Chairman – Ryan Buckley Vice Chairman – Ryan Lowe Secretary […]

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    Match Report

    A Cinderella Story: Quore Wins Fall League Championship

    Things weren’t looking great for Team Quore halfway through the league. After five losses, they had zero points in the standings and would most certainly be shut out if they couldn’t win every game left in the season. That’s exactly what they did, coming back from nothing on the board to tying up the whole […]

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    Match Report

    Fall League Standings: One Week Changes Everything

    While Quore got off to a rough start, the team has found cohesiveness of late and turned around the league standings table. Still behind second-place Homegrown by two points, next week’s league play could send them straight ahead to the finals. Yesterday’s matches were some of the most competitive and fun that Nashville GAC has […]

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    Match Report

    Mid-Season Fall League Standings

    With three days of matches finished and two more to go before the championship match on 11/4, we look back at the action of the past few weeks. Week one was a firm victory for East Nashville Beer Works, who won both of their matches against Homegrown and Quore. The play was fierce and the […]

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    All The Things You Want To Know About The 2018 All-Ireland Hurling Final

    Written by Matt O’Donnell Despite games such as rugby invading the hearts and minds of people in Ireland, there’s no hiding the fact that the All-Ireland finals are among the most watched events on television every year. Many people with either no Irish blood or a lack of skin in the game often only get […]

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    Just Games? Gaelic Sunday 100 Years On

    Matt O’DonnellNashville Gaelic Athletic Club Whether you come to the GAA or Gaelic games through Irish or American heritage (which we are lucky to have both of in our Nashville club), it’s easy to feel connected in self-determination, defiance, and revolution. That connection is easy to embody by remembering that when our oppressors came to keep us in line, they came for our leisure. For Americans, they will think back to when the British government came to profit from our tea. For the Irish, memory may be best served by considering when they came for our games. This year, August 4th will continue the glacial, yet powerful drive of Ireland’s “decade of centenaries” with commemorations of what we know as Gaelic Sunday. That day, which represents a vibrant balance of bold, systematic defiance and thankfully peaceful protest, is underrepresented as one of the tentpole acts of defiance against the rule of London in Ireland. Scholarship on the GAA and the Irish Revolution has done much in recent years leading up to the centenary of these events to pull together the dual narratives of the organization as a driving revolutionary force and of its failure to adopt any official stance into one much more realistic view. August 1918 was not the first time that we could have seen action taken against GAA fixtures. As early as 1914, during debates for the Day of Rest bill (regarding the legalities of work and activities on Sundays), an argument was made that Ireland deserved special dispensation for the principles that led Gaelic games to thrive and entertain. It was worried by many MP’s that holding the GAA in contempt of the bill for fixing matches on Sundays would cause great harm to Irish society, particularly to the working classes. While it can never truly be said that all members of the British government were unsympathetic to the self-determination of Ireland, attitudes would change at its higher levels as the tide of revolution moved in. It’s important to remember that Gaelic games returned to prominence and organized in 1884 as part of a greater move to increase Gaelic identity in a time when a great number of the population could close their eyes and remember the Great Famine, its subsequent widespread emigration, and the holding down of any calls for Ireland being ruled locally from Dublin. It would only make sense that members of the GAA would be incredibly likely to join organizations such as the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB), the Irish Volunteers, and others who lit the tinder box of Ireland. It was easier to see the ties out in the open during the aftermath of the Easter Rising in April 1916. As many members of the GAA participated, Dublin Castle began to keep more of an eye on meetings held in Dublin, which were dubbed the “Central Council of the GAA.” Matches were a routine part of the day for prisoners held in Frongoch, Wales. Tournaments were held in November 1916 and March 1917 to benefit the Irish National Aid and Volunteer Dependents’ Fund, which overwhelmingly supported all political prisoners interred for Nationalist activity. In fact, the GAA rapidly because the highest source of finance for the fund, both through these tournaments and from collections taken at matches. As the situation in Ireland began to be too much of a surge for the British government to hold back, it was decided in July 1918 to prohibit the holding of any public meetings in Ireland except under official permit. The GAA fell under this order, having been dubbed a “dangerous organization.” Shortly after, soldiers caused confrontations over matches in Offaly, Down, Kildare, and Cork. And so, on July 20th a unanimous decision was taken by those present at a GAA meeting that “no permits would be asked for under any conditions; and provisional councils, county committees, leagues and clubs were to be notified accordingly; and also, that no member was to participate in any competition if any permit had already been obtained.” Furthermore, they arranged that a mass fixture of matches would be set for 3pm on Sunday, August 4th. When August 4th came, practically every hurling and football club affiliated with the GAA took part. Thanks to the size of the participation, exact metrics are hard to pin down for certain. The general accepted number of matches of either sport that occurred is placed at 1,500 (though numbers as high as 1,800 have been commonly used as the high end, as well). The August 5th edition of the Freeman’s Journal reported that 54,000 players took part, while speculation of any number between 45,000 and 100,000 was claimed by the newspaper Sport. The number of spectators that came to support the matches was titanic, and no attempt at putting a number on the crowds is readily available. Dublin alone would see 24 matches played (22 football, 2 hurling). Seventeen matches were played in Kildare, where the county board decreed that any club that did not participate would face certain suspension. Cork would fix around 40 matches, though heavy rains would force most of them to be abandoned. Matches were also played between nationalist prisoners in a Belfast jail. In one minor victory for the authorities, Camogie players were barred from entering Croke Park. Instead, they played a match in the middle of Jones’ Road to a large crowd. At this level of widespread civil disobedience, the British authorities were utterly powerless. One match report notes that there were a large crowd of police at a match, but only as ticketed spectators. Gaelic Sunday is a true triumph in many ways. We can see it as a victory for the GAA in multiple ways. Not only did this mark an overt look towards a true statement by a previously a political facing organization, but as a beautiful expression of the way the sport is organized given that it was left to each county board to fix its own matches. The level of participation by every county is a mindblowing statement of the dedication to Gaelic games, whether you were standing up because the GAA represented something greater to your national identity or whether it was the fruition of the (likely long forgotten) debate on the Day of Rest bill in 1914. August 4th, 1918 is arguably the “largest, most widespread and successful act of public defiance against British rule in Ireland in the period between 1916 and 1922”. As previously stated, the fact that an act this size can be looked back on with clear certainty as a day of peaceful protest should gain it a greater place in the Irish Revolution. How glad we are that the centenary of Gaelic Sunday again falls on a weekend so that every club, no matter where, can remember this as we watch the late stages of All Ireland Championships in both football and hurling. Or perhaps even better, especially at home in the NGAC, take the field to play Gaelic games ourselves.

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    Everything You Need to Know When Joining the NGAC

    We know; joining a club is hard. We’ve all been there. There are the usual questions, like “Will everyone like me?” and “How much commitment is required?” Then, you realize you’re going to play a rare sport that’s only starting to grow in the US. Wow. So many questions. Have no fear. We’re here with […]

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    Gaelic Football Is Here!

    The Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club has announced the 2018 Summer League for Gaelic Football. If that interests you, here’s what you need to know: Training If you don’t already know how to play for feel you need a skills refresher, that’s okay! We’ll have a few weeks of training before the league starts, and training […]

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    4 Types of Athletes Who Need Gaelic Football in Their Lives

    Hey, maybe we’re a little biased, but we think Gaelic football is one of the greatest sports in the world. Sure, some of the NGAC might prefer a little bit of hurling or camogie instead, but in all, we think these Irish sports are pretty much the best. We’re so sure of it, that we’d […]

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    Match Report

    Congrats to Quore, Winners of the 2018 Spring League!

    It was a hard-fought battle between Quore and Homegrown this past Sunday, but the green team came up victorious in the end. Quore captain Ryan Culligan led his team through a nearly undefeated season (save for a forfeit or two), but Homegrown captain Evan Lamberth wasn’t going down without a fight. The scores from both […]

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    Match Report

    Dramatic Final Weeks of Spring League 2018

    It’s not over yet! In fact, the real excitement is just beginning. While Quore has cemented their spot in the final on June 10, it’s still up in the air for East Nashville Beer Works and Homegrown. In spite of a club-wide forfeit on Mother’s Day (which we probably should have seen coming), spirits are […]

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    Match Report

    Rain Puts a Damper on Week 2 League Matches

    After a very chilly opening day for Nashville’s spring hurling league, hopes were high for a warm, sunny day yesterday. Mother Nature had other plans. The pouring rain discouraged many from attending, leaving Homegrown to forfeit both matches. The match-up between East Nashville Beer Works and Quore, however, brought lots of excitement and culminated in […]

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    Updates

    Did We Meet You at Music City Irish Fest?

    We had a blast meeting everyone yesterday at the Music City Irish Fest, whether we saw you at the bar or at our own NGAC tent. Several of you took cards and learned about hurling and Gaelic football, and a few of you even seemed interested in joining. If that’s you–interested in joining or just […]

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    Music City Invitational Tournament to Take Place on March 24

    Nashville will again welcome hurling and camogie teams from across the Midwest and Southeast for our Fourth Annual Music City Invitational. This year, the tournament is an official Music City Irish Festival event! Here’s what you need to know so you can come enjoy a day filled with Irish sports. Date: March 24, 2018 Where: […]

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    17 Irish Things to Do in Nashville in March

    St. Patrick’s Day is on the way, and that means the Irish are out in force in Nashville. If you’re looking for something to do, we have a big list to choose from. Sports, music, art, beer… It’s all right here! So pull out your calendar and start making plans. Irish Music Session at The […]

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    Upcoming Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club Events

    It’s been a long, cold, lonely winter—except for those rare, sunny days when we got to scrimmage at Centennial Park. Spring is on the way, and everyone in the club is itching to pick up a hurl or Gaelic football and get back on the pitch. Fortunately, March will offer several opportunities to play (or […]

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    Members Updates

    Meet Your 2018 Board Members!

    At our AGM, we held elections for two open positions on the board. The first was for Chairman, as we said a heartfelt “thank you!” to Ryan Buckley for his two years of dedicated service. The second was the Treasurer role, held by the very capable Rayne Leonard. These elections also created additional vacancies within […]

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    Updates

    Open Board Positions for Election

    Nominations will be accepted for the following open Board positions from November 25th to December 9th. 1. Chairman Chairman: The Chairman shall convene regular board meetings, shall preside over meetings. The chairman sets the agenda for the board meetings, special meetings, and Annual General Meeting (AGM). The Chairman can arrange for one of the other […]

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    Match Report

    Congratulations to Fall League 2017 Champions East Nashville Beer Works!

    After a long, hard battle, the East Nashville Beer Works Ports took home the Harper Hurl yesterday. The team, led by captain Jesse Gentry beat the Quore Blue Notes with a score of 4-14 to 3-1.   Start making plans to join us in the spring! We already have several things in the works, including […]