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Just Games? Gaelic Sunday 100 Years On

Gaelic sunday

Written by Matt O’Donnell

Whether you come to the GAA or Gaelic games through Irish or American heritage (which we are lucky to have both of in our Nashville club), it’s easy to feel connected in self-determination, defiance, and revolution. That connection is easy to embody by remembering that when our oppressors came to keep us in line, they came for our leisure.

For Americans, they will think back to when the British government came to profit from our tea. For the Irish, memory may be best served by considering when they came for our games.

This year, August 4th will continue the glacial, yet powerful drive of Ireland’s “decade of centenaries” with commemorations of what we know as Gaelic Sunday. That day, which represents a vibrant balance of bold, systematic defiance and thankfully peaceful protest, is underrepresented as one of the tentpole acts of defiance against the rule of London in Ireland.

Scholarship on the GAA and the Irish Revolution has done much in recent years leading up to the centenary of these events to pull together the dual narratives of the organization as a driving revolutionary force and of its failure to adopt any official stance into one much more realistic view.

August 1918 was not the first time that we could have seen action taken against GAA fixtures. As early as 1914, during debates for the Day of Rest bill (regarding the legalities of work and activities on Sundays), an argument was made that Ireland deserved special dispensation for the principles that led Gaelic games to thrive and entertain. It was worried by many MP’s that holding the GAA in contempt of the bill for fixing matches on Sundays would cause great harm to Irish society, particularly to the working classes.

While it can never truly be said that all members of the British government were unsympathetic to the self-determination of Ireland, attitudes would change at its higher levels as the tide of revolution moved in. It’s important to remember that Gaelic games returned to prominence and organized in 1884 as part of a greater move to increase Gaelic identity in a time when a great number of the population could close their eyes and remember the Great Famine, its subsequent widespread emigration, and the holding down of any calls for Ireland being ruled locally from Dublin. It would only make sense that members of the GAA would be incredibly likely to join organizations such as the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB), the Irish Volunteers, and others who lit the tinder box of Ireland.

It was easier to see the ties out in the open during the aftermath of the Easter Rising in April 1916. As many members of the GAA participated, Dublin Castle began to keep more of an eye on meetings held in Dublin, which were dubbed the “Central Council of the GAA.” Matches were a routine part of the day for prisoners held in Frongoch, Wales. Tournaments were held in November 1916 and March 1917 to benefit the Irish National Aid and Volunteer Dependents’ Fund, which overwhelmingly supported all political prisoners interred for Nationalist activity. In fact, the GAA rapidly because the highest source of finance for the fund, both through these tournaments and from collections taken at matches.

As the situation in Ireland began to be too much of a surge for the British government to hold back, it was decided in July 1918 to prohibit the holding of any public meetings in Ireland except under official permit. The GAA fell under this order, having been dubbed a “dangerous organization.” Shortly after, soldiers caused confrontations over matches in Offaly, Down, Kildare, and Cork. And so, on July 20th a unanimous decision was taken by those present at a GAA meeting that “no permits would be asked for under any conditions; and provisional councils, county committees, leagues and clubs were to be notified accordingly; and also, that no member was to participate in any competition if any permit had already been obtained.” Furthermore, they arranged that a mass fixture of matches would be set for 3pm on Sunday, August 4th.

When August 4th came, practically every hurling and football club affiliated with the GAA took part. Thanks to the size of the participation, exact metrics are hard to pin down for certain. The general accepted number of matches of either sport that occurred is placed at 1,500 (though numbers as high as 1,800 have been commonly used as the high end, as well). The August 5th edition of the Freeman’s Journal reported that 54,000 players took part, while speculation of any number between 45,000 and 100,000 was claimed by the newspaper Sport. The number of spectators that came to support the matches was titanic, and no attempt at putting a number on the crowds is readily available.

Dublin alone would see 24 matches played (22 football, 2 hurling). Seventeen matches were played in Kildare, where the county board decreed that any club that did not participate would face certain suspension. Cork would fix around 40 matches, though heavy rains would force most of them to be abandoned. Matches were also played between nationalist prisoners in a Belfast jail. In one minor victory for the authorities, Camogie players were barred from entering Croke Park. Instead, they played a match in the middle of Jones’ Road to a large crowd.

At this level of widespread civil disobedience, the British authorities were utterly powerless. One match report notes that there were a large crowd of police at a match, but only as ticketed spectators.

Gaelic Sunday is a true triumph in many ways. We can see it as a victory for the GAA in multiple ways. Not only did this mark an overt look towards a true statement by a previously a political facing organization, but as a beautiful expression of the way the sport is organized given that it was left to each county board to fix its own matches. The level of participation by every county is a mindblowing statement of the dedication to Gaelic games, whether you were standing up because the GAA represented something greater to your national identity or whether it was the fruition of the (likely long forgotten) debate on the Day of Rest bill in 1914. August 4th, 1918 is arguably the “largest, most widespread and successful act of public defiance against British rule in Ireland in the period between 1916 and 1922”. As previously stated, the fact that an act this size can be looked back on with clear certainty as a day of peaceful protest should gain it a greater place in the Irish Revolution.

How glad we are that the centenary of Gaelic Sunday again falls on a weekend so that every club, no matter where, can remember this as we watch the late stages of All Ireland Championships in both football and hurling. Or perhaps even better, especially at home in the NGAC, take the field to play Gaelic games ourselves.

 

 

 

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17 Irish Things to Do in Nashville in March

irish in nashville

St. Patrick’s Day is on the way, and that means the Irish are out in force in Nashville. If you’re looking for something to do, we have a big list to choose from. Sports, music, art, beer… It’s all right here! So pull out your calendar and start making plans.

Irish Music Session at The Violin Shop – March 4

Visit the Violin Shop on 8th Avenue on Sunday between 4 pm and 8 pm to enjoy some classic Irish tunes. Bring your own instrument and join in the fun, or just sit back and listen. Some light snacks and beverages will be available, too, so you can make an evening of it.

Gabriel Donohue at BB King’s – March 5

Singer and instrumentalist from Galway Gabriel Donohue will perform at BB King’s, along with other Irish musicians. The show starts at 7 pm and a $10 cover charge will get you in.

Dropkick Murphys at Marathon Music Works – March 6

Celtic rock giants Dropkick Murphys will come to Nashville on March 6 for their St. Patrick’s Day tour. Pick up tickets for the show at the Marathon Music Works website.

Molly Ramone at The Old School – March 8

Nashville Irish band Molly Ramone will appear at The Old School restaurant on March 8 at 7 pm. Tickets for the event are $10. If you can’t make this one, you can see Molly Ramone again later this month.

County Sumner Irish Festival in Castalian Springs – March 10

Hosted by Visit Sumner TN, the County Sumner Irish Fest will take place form 10 am to 2 pm at Bledsoe’s Fort Historical Park. Enjoy live Irish music, brews, and great Irish food. You can also tour Rogan cottage, an authentic Irish dwelling. Don’t miss the hurling and Gaelic football exhibit matches by your favorite Gaelic club in Nashville.

Paul Brock Band at The Old School – March 10

The Old School will host Paul Brock, Denis Carey, Eimear Arkins, and Shane Farrell, playing Irish, French-Canadian, and bluegrass favorites. The show starts at 7 pm, and the tickets are $15 at the door.

Celtic Rhythms on Fire – March 10 & 11

The Nashville Irish Step Dancers will perform their annual March show on March 10 and 11 at The Capital Theatre on Main Street in Lebanon. Tickets for adults are $20, and $15 for kids and seniors. You can purchase tickets online here.

Triona at BB King’s – March 12

Ireland’s singer-songwriter Triona will perform original songs at BB King’s on March 12 at 7 pm. A cover charge of $10 covers entrance and the show.

Exploring Your Scots-Irish Genealogy – March 12 & 13

Join Fintan Mullan and Gillian Hunt from the Ulster Historical Foundation during their annual North American lecture tour to learn how to get the most out of Irish resources and records, gain strategies for breaking down brick walls, and grasp important historical context that may help fill in gaps in your research. Monday’s workshop is $15 for non-members. Tuesday is devoted to private consultations for $45 per person.

Irish Night at ACME – March 13

Come at 6 pm for the Finnegan & Carmichael concert and stay for the film John Hume in America at 7 pm. Following the film will be a Q&A session with the filmmaker Maurice Fitzpatrick. Admission is free!

Chloë Agnew of Celtic Woman at The Old School – March 15

One of the original Celtic Woman members, Chloë Agnew, will perform favorites and original tunes at The Old School from 7 pm to 10 pm. Tickets are $15 to $30 and can be purchased any time before the show.

Gulliver’s Travels at Nashville Public Library – March 16, 17, 23, 24, 30, & 31

Irish stories and puppetry will take over the library during these weekends at the Nashville Public Library. Perfect for the kids, but fun for all.

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration at Riverfront Park – March 17 & 18

Two days of fun, drink, food, music, and Irish goods await at the Nashville Riverfront Park. A stage will host musicians throughout both days, including Molly Ramone, Colm Kirwan, Nashville Pipes & Drums, The Willis Clan, Skerryvore, and We Banjo 3, among many others. Admission is free!

Main Street Brew Fest in Franklin – March 17

Tickets are available for the Main Street Brew Fest on St. Patrick’s Day, where dozens of micro-breweries—local, national, and international—will be featured. Enjoy live music, food trucks, and of course, beer.

The Luck of the Irish Pub Crawl – March 17

Registration begins at Winners Bar & Grill at 11 am. Stops on the crawl include Winners, Whiskey Rhythm Saloon, The Slider House, DawgHouse Saloon, and many more! It’s a great way to drink your way through Music City.

Shane Hennessy Shows – March 19 & 22

Irish guitarist Shane Hennessy will perform first at BB King’s on March 19 and then again at The Old School on March 22. BB King’s charges a $10 cover to get in. Tickets for The Old School show are $10 each.

Music City Invitational Hurling Tournament – March 24

The NGAC will again host clubs from various cities across the United States in a hurling and camogie tournament. Festivities will kick off at 9 am on March 24 and end with an after party and trophy presentation at East Nashville Beer Works at 7 pm.

There are quite a few more fun events planned for the Music City Irish Festival, which lasts all throughout the month of March. If this just isn’t enough Irish for you, check out their calendar for more!

As always, if you see anyone wearing a Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club crest, stop us and ask about hurling and Gaelic football. We’re starting our spring league soon, and we’d love to welcome you out to play or watch any time!

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Upcoming Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club Events

It’s been a long, cold, lonely winter—except for those rare, sunny days when we got to scrimmage at Centennial Park. Spring is on the way, and everyone in the club is itching to pick up a hurl or Gaelic football and get back on the pitch.

Fortunately, March will offer several opportunities to play (or watch!), so grab your calendar and start making some notes.

Intro to Hurling – Feb 3

Let’s get back in shape for the coming Music City Invitational and Spring League! Training starts at 9:00 am at Centennial Park.

Beginners are always welcome. We’ll make sure you have all the right equipment and show you the basics before you join in on a scrimmage. Don’t be afraid! Every member will take the time to walk you through the rules and help you learn technique as you go. There is absolutely no experience necessary. Of any kind.

Future training sessions will be announced via Facebook until it’s warm enough to set recurring dates.

County Sumner Irish Festival – March 10

On March 10, the NGAC will travel to Castalian Springs to take part in the County Sumner Irish Festival. The fest takes place between 10 am and 2 pm, with exhibition matches of hurling and Gaelic football on at noon.

If you come out to watch, stay to learn about the history of Irish sports and even learn how to play. If you love it, we’ll sign you up on the spot!

Music City Irish Fest – March 17 & 18

It’s two days of glorious shamrockery! The NGAC will man a tent where you can learn all about the sports of hurling and Gaelic football. We’ll show some classic matches and walk you through the rules. Or we’ll just clink beer mugs together with a “Sláinte!”* and sing along to Irish tunes with you.

You’ll also find us slinging beers at the beer tents. We’re always recognizable in our gold and green. Say hi when you find one of us!

Music City Invitational – March 24

We’re still ironing out the details, but you’ll definitely want to save this date. Hurling clubs from all over the United States will travel to Nashville for our 4th Annual Music City Invitational—probably our biggest yet.

The event lasts all day, with food and drink available for purchase on site. After the winners have been decided through fierce battles for the Watson and Wall Cups, we’ll party the night away with our sponsors, East Nashville Beer Works. You don’t want to miss this!

*Sláinte (slahn-cha) To your health, or “Cheers!”

 

 

 

 

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16 Irish Events to Attend in Nashville in March

march irish events in nashville

Maybe February 10 is too soon to start talking about how we’ll celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. Or maybe it’s our favorite holiday of the year, so we start thinking about it and planning for it all year long. It’s probably the second one. If that’s how you feel, too, then you’ll love these Irish events going on all over Nashville during the month of March. You may also appreciate the advance notice so you can get tickets before they sell out.

Some of these are part of the Music City Irish Fest, and you can keep up with that calendar on the festival website. We’re also running a giveaway for one of the events, so keep your eyes on this page to make sure you don’t miss your chance to win.

March 1 – Altan at the Franklin Theatre

This band from Donegal is considered an icon of traditional Irish music. To enjoy an evening of Irish jigs and reels, visit the website and get your tickets soon!

March 2-4 – Irish Film Festival at Watkins College

See some of the most popular Irish movies, including Leap Year, Brooklyn, Waking Ned Devine, and Jimmy’s Hall. (We might ask where The Wind That Shakes the Barley and The Commitments are in this list, but it’s still a good selection). It’s free to the public!

March 6 – TenX9 Storytelling at Douglas Corner Café

Nine people tell nine stories of ten minutes in length. The theme of the night is “Anything Irish,” so prepare to laugh, cry, and rage, as you’re entertained with real stories of Irish joy, struggle, and triumph. Or maybe just a funny story about a lad in a pub.

March 7 – Scots Irish Genealogy Event

Want to learn more about your heritage? Visit The Hermitage and discover your Irish and Scots Irish roots. Costs vary according to the activities you enjoy during the day. Learn more about it at the Hermitage’s website.

March 7-8 – Sharon Shannon at McNamara’s

Two nights of traditional Irish music from Shannon Sharon of County Clare, Ireland. Tickets are $20 per person and can be purchased through the McNamara’s website.

March 9-11 – The Chieftains at The Schermerhorn

Perhaps one of the best known traditional music acts in Ireland right now, The Chieftains tickets are known to sell out quickly, even with multiple shows. Get your tickets now at The Schermerhorn website.

March 11 – Introduction to Irish Sports with the NGAC

The NGAC will host a day of Irish sports for anyone who wants to join. Learning hurling and Gaelic football. If you love it, you can even join the club! Open to any and all over the age of 18, regardless of skill level or current athletic ability.

March 11 – Main Street Brewfest in Franklin

The 14th annual brewfest is a big part of Irish fun. Enjoy Celtic performers and Irish cheer as you sip on some of the best local and craft beer available. Tickets are required, and they sell out quickly. Get them here!

March 12-13 – The Final Days of Wolfe Tone at TPAC

This award-winning play tells the story of Ireland’s foremost rebel from the 1798 Irish rebellion. We’ll be giving tickets away to three lucky winners, but if you don’t want to take a chance on missing out, you can get tickets right now at the TPAC website.

March 14 – Traditional Irish Session at McNamara’s

Grab your instrument and join in as locals and guests play traditional music all evening. We gather there’ll be some room for dancing, too.

March 15 – Andrew Jackson’s 250th Birthday

Celebrate the 7th president’s Irish heritage at The Hermitage. The people of The Hermitage have been great friends to us over the past two years as we introduced hurling to the Highland Games. We reckon it’s because Old Hickory was Irish.

March 16 – Whiskey and Golf at the Sounds Stadium

Do you like whiskey? Do you like putt-putt golf? Then this is the evening for you! Just don’t party too hard on the course, because you have to save yourself for the big day!

March 17 – Party at McNamara’s

Enjoy a full day of Irish food, music, dancing, and fun at McNamara’s Irish Pub in Donelson. There’s a cover charge, so come prepared. The party lasts from 10 am to midnight. You’ll probably see a few of us there!

March 18-19 – Celtic Rhythms on Fire with the Nashville Irish Step Dancers

Enjoy beautiful and passionate Irish dance these two days during St. Patrick’s Day weekend. These tickets do sell quickly, so be sure to grab yours as soon as possible.

March 25 – Music City Invitational Tournament

Watch hurling, camogie, and maybe some Gaelic football as friends from clubs all over North America come to compete for the Music City Cup. The fun starts at 9 am and goes all day, including an after party. More info on that soon, so keep an eye on this page!

New events may crop up as plans are finalized. We’ll update with another post if that happens. For now, start marking your calendars so you can make it to everything!

 

**Edit 2/15 – The East Nashville St. Patrick’s Day Festival will not occur this year. It has been removed from the list. I know; we’ll miss it, too.

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How to Get Involved with the NGAC When You Don’t Play

We’re so excited to have new members and new fans on the sidelines! The Nashville GAC needs the support from wives, girlfriends, boyfriends, husbands, moms, dads, and friends just as much as we need the players. If you’re brand new to the world of Irish sports, you may be wondering just how you can get involved to help the club keep growing. Here are a few things that would definitely support the NGAC as we spread love for Irish sports and culture.

Become a Member

You don’t have to play—ever—to be a member of the club. The dues structure allows for non-playing members to join at $20 per year. What do you get with that $20? You get a voice in all major votes, which are usually held at the Annual General Meeting each December.

You also get some pretty neat swag every time we come out with something new. So far, we have bumper stickers, T-shirts, koozies, and key chains. More cool stuff is always in the works.

Ready to join now? Send your $20 through PayPal to banker.ngac@gmail.com.

Come Prepared

If you’ve been out to watch a match, you know things can get a little intense. Players are usually concerned with having their hurley, helmet, and jersey. Everything else might get left behind. That means extra ice, water, bandages, pain meds, wraps, and even hurleys could help a great deal.

Join a Committee

Want to give even more? We have committees planning, moving, and shaking all year long. Our most important ones focus on recruitment and events. If you’d like to know more about these, contact Emily Rodriguez and Brendan Rauer, respectively. We also would love to revisit fundraising and sponsorship possibilities and could use a little leadership in that area.

If you have other talents that might be of use, let us know! If we don’t have a committee for it already, we’ll put one together.

Become a Board Member

Believe it or not, you don’t have to play hurling, camogie, or Gaelic football to serve on the board. Any member is eligible to serve. This year, we’ll have several openings available, so think about offering your time, organizational skills, and leadership abilities by serving on the board.

Spread the Word

We’re a grassroots organization, which means we see our biggest growth through word of mouth. If you know someone who might like our sports, tell them about us! If they’re okay with you sharing their contact information, just let us know and we can take it from there.

Just Keep Cheering

Nothing is more exciting than hearing those cheers from the sidelines. We started small, with one person on the sidelines every Sunday. Now, we see upwards of twenty on really great days. The cheering section inspires players to keep giving their all, which means they have to learn as much as they can about the sport, come to trainings and events, and push hard to carry their team to victory. In other words, just cheering the players on helps us grow as a club. You do that!

We can’t tell you how happy we are that you’re here. There really are no words to express our gratitude for your support thus far. Whether you decide to do one or all of the things listed above, you’re driving us forward. Welcome to the club.

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4 Facts You Should Know About Hurling

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If your fact-finding mission about hurling includes watching a match, breathless and eyes bugged out while you try to absorb everything going on, then it’ll be a long while before you learn everything you need to know. There are a few things that everyone who’s ever played the game hold true in their hearts—things no fact-finding mission could ever erase.

  • Once you play hurling, no other sport will suffice.
  • Sure, it looks dangerous. What’s the point of playing a sport that can’t get you killed?
  • You’ll be made fun of for wearing protective gear other than the required helmet.
  • A pint after training, matches, or a general puck around is required. REQUIRED.

Ask anyone who plays; they’ll back us up. And while this might convince you to give hurling (or camogie) a shot—and thank God, because that’s what this blog is all about—it still doesn’t give you the hard facts.

1. Hurling is about 3,000 years old.

Let’s consider the things that were going on in the world during the first years that hurling was played. The Iron Age. Ancient Greece. The Roman Empire. The Persian Empire after that. It’s even older than the recorded history of Ireland. If you’re looking for a sport that will impress your friends, you’ve found it.

2. A hurling pitch in Ireland can be as big as 158 yards by 98 yards.

Yeah, the pitch is huge, but that much flat, open space is hard to find here in the States, so we usually use American football or soccer fields. We also play with fewer people on teams. If we played with Ireland’s usual 15 a side, then there wouldn’t be enough room to run on the smaller fields here. In larger cities, such as Chicago and New York, the Irish populations are big enough to warrant full-sized fields and teams. For the most part, however, you’d get started on something much smaller here.

3. Protective gear really is sparse.

Imagine a sport this brutal played without any protective gear at all. That’s what happened for three thousand years. Before 2010, the hurley (stick) was the only protection a player could count on. Now, helmets are required. And, while you might get a little ribbing from your teammates for investing in additional protective gear, it’s never a bad idea to protect other parts of your body as well. (You may or may not want to click the link. Among other sports-related injuries, you’ll also be regaled with a tale about a shattered testicle.) Really. Wear the gear.

4. Even the best hurlers in Ireland play for free.

In this sport, glory is all you get. There isn’t a single professional hurler or camogie player in the world. These hurlers draw crowds in the tens of thousands, risk life and limb, and bring home enormous trophies to their home counties, all because they love the game that much.

Now, be honest with yourself. Wouldn’t you love to play a sport that inspires that kind of dedication? Wouldn’t you love to hit the pitch with your teammates and lose yourself in a sport that’s been three millennia in the making? Wouldn’t you love to finish off a day of Irish culture and sport with a cold beer and banter with your local hurling club?

You can. And if you reach out now, you WILL. If you’d prefer to check it all out before you join, that’s cool. Visit our Facebook page to see what we’re up to all the time. Come out and watch a puck around and get an introduction to the people, the equipment, and the game.

And remember, if you’re reading this but don’t live in Nashville, it’s not over yet. Google hurling in your city. There’s probably a club nearby. If there’s not, maybe it’s about time someone started one.

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Nashville City League Match Report

Week 3 of Competitive League

By: Jameson Hurley

Week 3 of the Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club proved even more exciting than the first two weeks. As player skill and fitness improves, so does the quality of play. Officially, it was the second day of summer, and if game time temperatures were any indication, Nashville is in for a hot one. It was as if the men and women of the NGAC wanted to be “one in heat-suffering spirit” with the USA Men’s Soccer team, as game time temperatures in Nashville exceeded those predicted in Manaus for later in the day. With pop-up tents for shade, and ice water on hand, the matches were underway.

Match 1 featured the Blue Notes v. the Leesiders. A question hanged heavy in the heavy hanging air: Would Captain Gill lead the Lees to victory with the confidence gained from their prior week’s win over the Blue Notes, or would Captain Joley rally his squad and rebound from their loss? It was clear from the start that this would be a memorable battle. The ball moved about the field like a butterfly on a calm spring day, but when shots were fired for scores, they were erratic and often off target. While the gladiators did battle at midfield, the goalies were kept busy with puck outs after the countless wides. In time though, the scores did come, with Anji Wall leading all scorers with 5 points from play. The score line remained close throughout the match, with both teams gaining and losing their advantage, but in the end, it was the grit and determination of the mighty Blue Notes that won on the day, edging out the Leesiders by 1 point. Blue Notes 1-7 (13) to Leesiders 2-6 (12).

With that, the Leesiders retreated to the shade for rest while the Blue Notes remained in the sun’s glaring rays for the second match of the day. Captain Ouellette’s Ports, eager to hold the top position in the league, and to rebound from their drawn match against the Notes in week 2, took to the pitch in varsity fashion. From the throw in it was clear that the Ports meant business, marking the opening score of the game. The Notes gave an early response, with a cracker of a goal from Captain Joley, but that was nearly it for the scoring from the Dublin colored side. Captain Ouellette, in goal, locked down the net, and his defenders took care of minimizing points from play. Some fantastic battles took place for the ball, but all too often it was the Ports who emerged from the scrum with possession. And all too often those won battles resulted in goals and points. The Blue Notes, exhausted from their earlier battle, did indeed leave it all on the pitch, but at the final whistle, the referee’s score card read: Blue Notes 2-1 (7) to Ports 5-6 (21).

nashville hurling leagueDid the Ports leave enough in the tank to finish the day with two wins? The Leesiders emerged from the shade, and took to the pitch to find out. You’ll recall the incredible battle between these two teams during the second week of play, when the Ports scored a late goal to defeat the red and white side by two points. From the opening toss, this match looked to rival that classic. Quick scores from both sides got things going, and the points continued to come with ease, in this, the second highest scoring match of the season. The usual suspects: Nick Chamberlain, Eric Vick, and Corbett Ouellette for the Ports, and C.s. Kammerzell and Sam D’Amico for the Leesiders, were joined by newcomers to the scoring sheet, Jesse Gammons and Greg Roberts, who all had points from play. The crowd was treated to an exciting and very tightly contested match, and when the referee blew his whistle for the “player welfare water break,” The teams were separated by only 1 point. At the restart, it was clear that both sides had imbibed on some sort of “goal scoring” tonic during the break, as the sleepy keepers were unable to defend their nets. A final Leesider free into the box failed to be converted by the attackers for a much-needed goal, and with that the full-time whistle blew. The Ports held their seat at the top of the table. Ports 5-8 (23) to Leesiders 4-7 (19).

Join us for the games next week at 4:00 at Heartland fields. Game 1, Ports v. Blue Notes, followed by Blue Notes v. Leesiders, and finally, Leesider v. Ports.

Standings: Ports 16 pts., Blue Notes 7 pts., Leesiders 3 pts.

Nashville hurling city league DSC_4540 DSC_4523 DSC_4519 DSC_4518 DSC_4509 DSC_4494 DSC_4399 DSC_4473 DSC_4387 DSC_4411 DSC_4535All photos by Ashley Raby.