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All The Things You Want To Know About The 2018 All-Ireland Hurling Final

galway limerick hurling final

Written by Matt O’Donnell

Despite games such as rugby invading the hearts and minds of people in Ireland, there’s no hiding the fact that the All-Ireland finals are among the most watched events on television every year. Many people with either no Irish blood or a lack of skin in the game often only get their eyes in front of the competition when it finally comes down to the two best counties playing on the final match day of the year (for inter-county play). This being the case, we’ll take a look at this year’s participants, Limerick and the reigning champions, Galway. We’ll see them from a standpoint of their county’s history as well as a look at the road that each took to get to Croke Park this coming Sunday. 

Galway and Limerick are two of those counties that are fairly bound together in destiny for hurling. Despite having only irregular matches due to playing in different provinces and different periods of dominance affecting their standings in the same division of the National League, they’ve faced off in the All-Ireland season eleven times. While Limerick owns a winning record of 6 matches to Galway’s 4 (plus a draw), a pair of Galway’s wins are the 1923 and 1980 All-Ireland Championship medals. 

Galway

134 years after the establishment of the GAA, many counties can claim to be thought of as important to the game. No matter who you’d support, though, its easy to agree that Galway has been a solid rock since the establishment of organized play. Even if we overlook an apocryphal story about Michael Cusack wanting to establish the GAA in Galway (a story full of plot holes), we know that early hurling tournaments were a huge draw in the county by 1887. The popularity and skill shown in Galway led them to enter a team in the first All-Ireland championship that year. Under the banner of the Meelick club, Galway would reach the final before losing to the Tipperary champions, Thurles. They have never received the losers’ medals that they are entitled to.

Despite nearly two decades of dominance in Connacht provincial play after the dawn of the 20th century, Galway would finally stand alone as champions in 1923, losing the following three finals they appeared in. Despite incredible club hurling in the county, the inter-county record in the decades that followed for the Tribesmen resulted in not much more than heartbreak. The side would finally raise the cup in 1980, defeating…Limerick. This championship came at a time of pain for the west of Ireland, suffering from both great economic hardship and subsequent mass emigration. The speeches of Joe Connolly and Joe McDonagh from the Hogan Stand live on in glory to this day. Senior medals were won in 1987 and 1988 against perennial powers Kilkenny and Tipp, respectively. Despite overwhelming wins in the All-Ireland club championship, The West would only awaken again in 2017 to finally win a championship for modern hurling phenom Joe Canning. 

Limerick

In light of Galway’s unity and prominence from near enough the moment that organized play under the GAA began, it’s with a more somber mood that we consider the early years of Limerick. Despite the Limerick Commercials winning a senior football title for the county in 1887, unrest of the political flavor caused bitter division and controversy for a decade. Despite walkouts, abandonment of fixtures, and even multiple county boards at one point, Limerick recovered thanks to an emergency convention to establish a new governing body in 1894. Commercials would claim their second football title in 1896. Then finally, in 1897, the Kilfinane club would topple Tullaroan from Kilkenny to make Limerick All-Ireland Senior Hurling champions for the first time. 

1910 would be the next time that Limerick, represented by the Castleconnell club, would reach a final. 1918 would see another title, spurred by a new dedication to preparation. Limerick adopted the style or training pioneered by Clare and Laois of players being on a strict diet, grueling physical regimen, and a training camp held in the lead-up to the final. Having lost to Wexford in their previous appearance, Limerick won the final this time by 26 points, an utterly crushing contest. They’d do it all over again in 1921, beating Dublin 8-5 to 3-2, but the real story of The Shannonsiders would be told through the 1930’s. In that decade, they’d win not only the 1934, 1936, and 1940 All-Ireland titles, but they’d also win the National League a ridiculous 5 times in a row, from seasons ending in 1934 through 1938. 

Limerick’s 1973 All-Ireland is their only senior title since 1940. Despite this, polling in the decades that have passed shows that passion, participation, and support for Gaelic games in the county have never dwindled. This will be their first appearance in the Croke Park final since 2007. 

The 2018 Hurling Season

At the GAA Special Congress in 2017, it was decided that rather than have provincial knockout tournaments, the Senior Hurling Championship would be played using round-robin groups of 5 teams in both Leinster and Munster, while the B Championship would move to a system more like the National League (the specifics of this are available upon request, though it’s worth mentioning that the cup for the new highest tier of the B system has been named after the aforementioned Galway man, Joe McDonagh). Most agreed from the very start of the summer that this system helped produce the most exciting hurling championship in recent memory, with the most extreme saying that it’s by far the best ever. 

It’s truly hard to say which side had the harder time of it getting to this Sunday. Limerick finished straight in the middle of the pack of the Munster Championship, with 2 wins, a draw, and a loss. They opened with a less than comfortable, in hurling score possibility, win over Tipperary 1-23 to 2-14, before moving on to draw with eventual division winners Cork. They would work through the back half of the Munster group 2-26 to 1-16 before taking it on the chin from Clare by 9 points. Thanks to the 3rd place finish in the province, they placed in the preliminary quarter-finals, starting with an absolute demolition of Carlow, scoring 5-22 to 13 points. In the quarter-final, they just barely got over the line against Kilkenny, taking a single point to victory for the first time in the competition since 1973. Only a slightly larger 4 points would separate them from Cork in the semi-final, in what was absolutely be a classic game for the ages. Watch it if you can. 

On the other hand, Galway are here by some combination of dominance and good fortune. No one could touch them through the round-robin phase of the Leinster Championship, trouncing Offaly, Kilkenny, Wexford, and Dublin in order. On July 1st, nothing separated Galway from Kilkenny at 18 points each in the Leinster final, forcing them to do it again the next week. On that day, 3 goals from Kilkenny weren’t enough to stifle an increased number of players joining in the scoring and they fell to the Tribesmen. As provincial winners, Galway didn’t appear again until the All-Ireland semi-final round, where they faced off against Clare, who had just knocked off Davy Fitz’s continual building side from Wexford. Galway were again made honest men of when they drew Clare at 1-30 apiece, forcing a replay. While the defending champions were able to adjust to Kilkenny and win that replay by 7 points, the repeat of the semi-final was only decided by a point.

While there have been plenty of storied meetings between these two counties, the easiest place we can look to find what we may need to know was during this year’s National League. Limerick took the day back in March, defeating Galway by a score of 2-18 to 1-19. The already oft-mentioned Joe Canning is second in total points scored in this championship with 1-69, while Limerick’s seventh placer Aaron Gillane sits with only 1-34. At the same time, both Gillane and Shane Dowling both make the top list of scorers in a single game at 0-13 and 0-15 respectively. 

Many GAA pundits see the maturity, consistency, and toughness of Limerick’s play over the full 70 minutes as possibly being an edge, if there is one favoring Limerick. In both semi-final appearances against Clare, Galway bounded out ahead early before letting Clare come back and make it worrisome for Micheál Donoghue’s squad until the final whistle. On one hand, the dominance of a scorer like Canning and his supporting cast including Cathal Mannion playing in a direct return to the Croke Park final gives them an experience that Limerick haven’t had for a moment in time, only last having lost to Kilkenny in 2007, the second of four consecutive titles for an utterly dominant side of The Cats. Irish bookmakers Paddy Power set the odds for this match at Galway 4/7 and Limerick 11/8, with 9/1 odds of a draw. No matter which captain raises the Liam MacCarthy Cup on Sunday, it will have been well earned. 

 

*If you want to watch it all go down with the NGAC, join us at 9 am on August 19 at East Nashville Beer Works. We’ll have Irish Breakfast Pizza on a pizza buffet ($10), plus beer and wine available.

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Gaelic Football Is Here!


The Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club has announced the 2018 Summer League for Gaelic Football. If that interests you, here’s what you need to know:

Training

If you don’t already know how to play for feel you need a skills refresher, that’s okay! We’ll have a few weeks of training before the league starts, and training will continue throughout until the championship match. Training will take place Thursdays at 6 pm at Centennial Park, starting this Thursday, June 21.

Matches

Last year, matches were held indoors but we were constrained by the size of the pitch. This year, we’re moving outdoors to a larger field. We’ll play in the evenings to beat the heat. Starting July 22, we’ll play every Sunday evening at 7 pm at 3135 Heartland Drive. The last match will be August 19.

Fees

We work hard to keep our prices down so everyone who wants to learn Irish sports can. To play in the summer league, you’ll need to join the NGAC. Membership is $20. This earns you an invitation to and a vote at our Annual General Meeting and Holiday Party. The fee for the league is $40, which covers the cost of your jersey and the use of the fields. The total is $60.

Participation

We can’t grow the Gaelic if you don’t come out and join in the fun. We hold social and business events throughout the year and hope you’ll join us as often as you can. The more involved you are, the easier it will be to continue growing Gaelic so that we can offer more Gaelic.

This doesn’t work without YOU. Also, we’re pretty cool people who make good friends outside of the club, too.

If you’d like to get more involved, please consider joining our NGAC members Facebook group. We make announcements on the regular there, and you’ll be more likely to stay in the loop on impromptu scrimmages, hangouts, and other fun stuff. You can find us here.

GAELIC FOOTBALL SUMMER LEAGUE SIGN-UP

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Music City Invitational Tournament to Take Place on March 24

music city invitational tournament

Nashville will again welcome hurling and camogie teams from across the Midwest and Southeast for our Fourth Annual Music City Invitational. This year, the tournament is an official Music City Irish Festival event! Here’s what you need to know so you can come enjoy a day filled with Irish sports.

Date: March 24, 2018

Where: Metro Soccer Complex, 1266 Donelson Pike, Nashville

Opening ceremonies: 9:30 am

Championship matches: 5:00 pm

Afters: 7:00 pm at East Nashville Beer Works

We’ll be playing on two fields throughout the day. They’re located at the far end of Metro Soccer Complex. Games will start every hour on the hour. A food truck will be available at lunch time, so bring some cash! As always, no alcohol is allowed in any metro park. Besides, there will be plenty of beer at afters, where we’ll also hold the trophy ceremony.

The tournament is free to the public. We hope to see you there!

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17 Irish Things to Do in Nashville in March

irish in nashville

St. Patrick’s Day is on the way, and that means the Irish are out in force in Nashville. If you’re looking for something to do, we have a big list to choose from. Sports, music, art, beer… It’s all right here! So pull out your calendar and start making plans.

Irish Music Session at The Violin Shop – March 4

Visit the Violin Shop on 8th Avenue on Sunday between 4 pm and 8 pm to enjoy some classic Irish tunes. Bring your own instrument and join in the fun, or just sit back and listen. Some light snacks and beverages will be available, too, so you can make an evening of it.

Gabriel Donohue at BB King’s – March 5

Singer and instrumentalist from Galway Gabriel Donohue will perform at BB King’s, along with other Irish musicians. The show starts at 7 pm and a $10 cover charge will get you in.

Dropkick Murphys at Marathon Music Works – March 6

Celtic rock giants Dropkick Murphys will come to Nashville on March 6 for their St. Patrick’s Day tour. Pick up tickets for the show at the Marathon Music Works website.

Molly Ramone at The Old School – March 8

Nashville Irish band Molly Ramone will appear at The Old School restaurant on March 8 at 7 pm. Tickets for the event are $10. If you can’t make this one, you can see Molly Ramone again later this month.

County Sumner Irish Festival in Castalian Springs – March 10

Hosted by Visit Sumner TN, the County Sumner Irish Fest will take place form 10 am to 2 pm at Bledsoe’s Fort Historical Park. Enjoy live Irish music, brews, and great Irish food. You can also tour Rogan cottage, an authentic Irish dwelling. Don’t miss the hurling and Gaelic football exhibit matches by your favorite Gaelic club in Nashville.

Paul Brock Band at The Old School – March 10

The Old School will host Paul Brock, Denis Carey, Eimear Arkins, and Shane Farrell, playing Irish, French-Canadian, and bluegrass favorites. The show starts at 7 pm, and the tickets are $15 at the door.

Celtic Rhythms on Fire – March 10 & 11

The Nashville Irish Step Dancers will perform their annual March show on March 10 and 11 at The Capital Theatre on Main Street in Lebanon. Tickets for adults are $20, and $15 for kids and seniors. You can purchase tickets online here.

Triona at BB King’s – March 12

Ireland’s singer-songwriter Triona will perform original songs at BB King’s on March 12 at 7 pm. A cover charge of $10 covers entrance and the show.

Exploring Your Scots-Irish Genealogy – March 12 & 13

Join Fintan Mullan and Gillian Hunt from the Ulster Historical Foundation during their annual North American lecture tour to learn how to get the most out of Irish resources and records, gain strategies for breaking down brick walls, and grasp important historical context that may help fill in gaps in your research. Monday’s workshop is $15 for non-members. Tuesday is devoted to private consultations for $45 per person.

Irish Night at ACME – March 13

Come at 6 pm for the Finnegan & Carmichael concert and stay for the film John Hume in America at 7 pm. Following the film will be a Q&A session with the filmmaker Maurice Fitzpatrick. Admission is free!

Chloë Agnew of Celtic Woman at The Old School – March 15

One of the original Celtic Woman members, Chloë Agnew, will perform favorites and original tunes at The Old School from 7 pm to 10 pm. Tickets are $15 to $30 and can be purchased any time before the show.

Gulliver’s Travels at Nashville Public Library – March 16, 17, 23, 24, 30, & 31

Irish stories and puppetry will take over the library during these weekends at the Nashville Public Library. Perfect for the kids, but fun for all.

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration at Riverfront Park – March 17 & 18

Two days of fun, drink, food, music, and Irish goods await at the Nashville Riverfront Park. A stage will host musicians throughout both days, including Molly Ramone, Colm Kirwan, Nashville Pipes & Drums, The Willis Clan, Skerryvore, and We Banjo 3, among many others. Admission is free!

Main Street Brew Fest in Franklin – March 17

Tickets are available for the Main Street Brew Fest on St. Patrick’s Day, where dozens of micro-breweries—local, national, and international—will be featured. Enjoy live music, food trucks, and of course, beer.

The Luck of the Irish Pub Crawl – March 17

Registration begins at Winners Bar & Grill at 11 am. Stops on the crawl include Winners, Whiskey Rhythm Saloon, The Slider House, DawgHouse Saloon, and many more! It’s a great way to drink your way through Music City.

Shane Hennessy Shows – March 19 & 22

Irish guitarist Shane Hennessy will perform first at BB King’s on March 19 and then again at The Old School on March 22. BB King’s charges a $10 cover to get in. Tickets for The Old School show are $10 each.

Music City Invitational Hurling Tournament – March 24

The NGAC will again host clubs from various cities across the United States in a hurling and camogie tournament. Festivities will kick off at 9 am on March 24 and end with an after party and trophy presentation at East Nashville Beer Works at 7 pm.

There are quite a few more fun events planned for the Music City Irish Festival, which lasts all throughout the month of March. If this just isn’t enough Irish for you, check out their calendar for more!

As always, if you see anyone wearing a Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club crest, stop us and ask about hurling and Gaelic football. We’re starting our spring league soon, and we’d love to welcome you out to play or watch any time!

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Upcoming Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club Events

It’s been a long, cold, lonely winter—except for those rare, sunny days when we got to scrimmage at Centennial Park. Spring is on the way, and everyone in the club is itching to pick up a hurl or Gaelic football and get back on the pitch.

Fortunately, March will offer several opportunities to play (or watch!), so grab your calendar and start making some notes.

Intro to Hurling – Feb 3

Let’s get back in shape for the coming Music City Invitational and Spring League! Training starts at 9:00 am at Centennial Park.

Beginners are always welcome. We’ll make sure you have all the right equipment and show you the basics before you join in on a scrimmage. Don’t be afraid! Every member will take the time to walk you through the rules and help you learn technique as you go. There is absolutely no experience necessary. Of any kind.

Future training sessions will be announced via Facebook until it’s warm enough to set recurring dates.

County Sumner Irish Festival – March 10

On March 10, the NGAC will travel to Castalian Springs to take part in the County Sumner Irish Festival. The fest takes place between 10 am and 2 pm, with exhibition matches of hurling and Gaelic football on at noon.

If you come out to watch, stay to learn about the history of Irish sports and even learn how to play. If you love it, we’ll sign you up on the spot!

Music City Irish Fest – March 17 & 18

It’s two days of glorious shamrockery! The NGAC will man a tent where you can learn all about the sports of hurling and Gaelic football. We’ll show some classic matches and walk you through the rules. Or we’ll just clink beer mugs together with a “Sláinte!”* and sing along to Irish tunes with you.

You’ll also find us slinging beers at the beer tents. We’re always recognizable in our gold and green. Say hi when you find one of us!

Music City Invitational – March 24

We’re still ironing out the details, but you’ll definitely want to save this date. Hurling clubs from all over the United States will travel to Nashville for our 4th Annual Music City Invitational—probably our biggest yet.

The event lasts all day, with food and drink available for purchase on site. After the winners have been decided through fierce battles for the Watson and Wall Cups, we’ll party the night away with our sponsors, East Nashville Beer Works. You don’t want to miss this!

*Sláinte (slahn-cha) To your health, or “Cheers!”

 

 

 

 

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Did We Meet You Today at the Middle Tennessee Highland Games?

We had such a blast at the Middle Tennessee Highland Games, and it was all because of YOU, the people we were able to meet. Thank you so much for spending some time with us, learning about our sport, and cheering us on as we played. How exciting it was to hear applause and shouting from the sidelines!

The whole idea behind playing expo matches is to show off Irish sports and find other people who might also fall in love with hurling (and maybe Gaelic football, too). We were able to talk with several of you, and we know you’re interested in giving things a shot. We want that more than anything!

You have nothing to be afraid of. Everyone one of us was new at one point, even the very few of us who’d actually played hurling before. Imagine how nervous our founder was when he started a Gaelic sports team with just he and his wife. Sometimes you just have to take that leap, right?

We don’t want you to be scared, so we’ve put together a few articles to help. You should find all the info you need to get you started. If you have any more questions, you can always send us an email. Even better, come out to a match or a training and ask in person.

Everything You Need to Know When Joining the NGAC

How to Get Involved with the NGAC When You Don’t Play

Before we go, we’d like to invite you out tomorrow at 1 pm to watch our fall league opener. It’s going to be a lot of fun, with three very competitive matches with three very evenly matched teams. If you thought you saw some amazing hurling today, you’ve seen nothing yet. We were just having fun, but tomorrow, a trophy is on the line.

We’ll play every Sunday through the rest of September and all of October. Our championship match will take place on the second Sunday of November, on the eleventh. If you can’t come out tomorrow, you can find us at Heartland Fields any other week until the day we find out who will win the Harper Hurl. You’re welcome any time.

We hope to see all of you again soon!

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All the News from the NGAC

NGAC News

The last month has been so busy for the Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club that this poor blogger couldn’t keep up with it all. Instead of several posts, we’ll wrap up all the fun here in one big post.

Intro to Hurling Day

It seems that our planned intro days get rained out more often than not. This time, nature one-upped herself and sent snow. Our March 11 Intro to Hurling Day was quickly postponed to the next day, which was of course beautiful and mild.

We welcomed out a few new people, but we fear we may have missed out on a large crowd due to the last-minute postponement. For that reason, we’ve decided to never tell Mother Nature when our next intro day is. Instead, we’ll choose a week each month for beginners to come out and give Irish sports a try. Keep an eye on our events on the Facebook page to catch the next one.

Of course, you NEVER have to wait for an intro day. Beginners are welcome all the time, any time we have social events or training. Someone will always take time out to teach you the basics if you want to learn.

NGAC on Today in Nashville

If you missed our exultant cries of delight on social media, here’s the scoop: On St. Patrick’s Day, Nashville’s WSMV featured the club on their Today in Nashville show. We filmed the spot on March 10 (a day before the crazy snow) at Centennial Park, with two full hours of hurling and Gaelic football scrimmages that resulted in amazing shots from the production crew.

If you haven’t seen the segment yet, check it out below.

WSMV Channel 4

Music City Invitational

Not publishing a write-up for this one was painful, but time kept marching on with more and more exciting things for Nashville GAC. On March 25, we welcomed clubs from all over America to play in a hurling and camogie tournament that lasted all day.

Opening ceremonies, led by Liam Barry, included remarks from club chairman Ryan Buckley, the American national anthem by Jennifer Barry, and the Irish national anthem by Caleb Harper. We were also very fortunate to enjoy Irish fiddle music from Dr. Ron Bombardi as we set up the fields.

Nashville split into two teams—Green and Gold—with Green winning its first match over Indy B. Gold fell to Knoxville but rallied well in their consolation match. Green played Coastal Virginia in the second round and were defeated. Still, it was an exciting day with enough proof for these players to know they’ve grown enormously in skill over the past four years.

The day ended with Atlanta A taking home the Wall Cup for camogie, and Indy A took home the Watson Cup for hurling. We presented the trophies at our afters celebrations with sponsors Smith & Lentz Brewing in East Nashville. It was an amazing day, and we already look forward to next year.

Spring League 2017

Our spring league registration topped out at 45 players, some pretty exciting growth after eight seasons. Each of the three teams has 15 players, and we bumped up play to 11-a-side, with 25-minute halves.

Our sponsors this season have been announced, but if you missed the posts, take a look at the incredible jerseys below, with sponsors East Nashville Beer Works, Homegrown Taproom & Marketplace, and Quore proudly and gratefully displayed.

The season officially started April 2, but it’s not too late to get in on the action. If you sign up by April 23, our third match of the season, you can be placed on a team. After that, you’ll have to wait until the fall.

Of course, we also travel to tournaments in the summer, so go ahead and join up anyway so you’ll be ready to play for Nashville GAC when we head to our first competition.

spring league 2017 jerseys

The Ben & Morey Show

This all brings us to last night, when Benjy Flynn and Britti Himelfarb represented the club on live, late-night talk show The Ben & Morey Show. If you haven’t heard of Ben and Morey, look them up. If you haven’t been to a show, make a point to head over to the Performing Arts Center at Centennial Park on a Thursday night.

Ben and Britti represented the club with pride and a lot of humor. They both had the crowd in stitches with their quick wit, but they also managed to convey their serious love for Irish sports. The club Instagram has a few images from the evening, and we hope to soon post the full interview.

If you met any of us at the show, please feel free to reach out with questions. You can also join us for intro sessions, trainings, or just to watch a match. Our Facebook page has an event schedule with all the latest information, or you can check the calendar here on the website.

This Sunday is week 2 of the spring league. We’d love to see you out there at 3135 Heartland Drive in Donelson!

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16 Irish Events to Attend in Nashville in March

march irish events in nashville

Maybe February 10 is too soon to start talking about how we’ll celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. Or maybe it’s our favorite holiday of the year, so we start thinking about it and planning for it all year long. It’s probably the second one. If that’s how you feel, too, then you’ll love these Irish events going on all over Nashville during the month of March. You may also appreciate the advance notice so you can get tickets before they sell out.

Some of these are part of the Music City Irish Fest, and you can keep up with that calendar on the festival website. We’re also running a giveaway for one of the events, so keep your eyes on this page to make sure you don’t miss your chance to win.

March 1 – Altan at the Franklin Theatre

This band from Donegal is considered an icon of traditional Irish music. To enjoy an evening of Irish jigs and reels, visit the website and get your tickets soon!

March 2-4 – Irish Film Festival at Watkins College

See some of the most popular Irish movies, including Leap Year, Brooklyn, Waking Ned Devine, and Jimmy’s Hall. (We might ask where The Wind That Shakes the Barley and The Commitments are in this list, but it’s still a good selection). It’s free to the public!

March 6 – TenX9 Storytelling at Douglas Corner Café

Nine people tell nine stories of ten minutes in length. The theme of the night is “Anything Irish,” so prepare to laugh, cry, and rage, as you’re entertained with real stories of Irish joy, struggle, and triumph. Or maybe just a funny story about a lad in a pub.

March 7 – Scots Irish Genealogy Event

Want to learn more about your heritage? Visit The Hermitage and discover your Irish and Scots Irish roots. Costs vary according to the activities you enjoy during the day. Learn more about it at the Hermitage’s website.

March 7-8 – Sharon Shannon at McNamara’s

Two nights of traditional Irish music from Shannon Sharon of County Clare, Ireland. Tickets are $20 per person and can be purchased through the McNamara’s website.

March 9-11 – The Chieftains at The Schermerhorn

Perhaps one of the best known traditional music acts in Ireland right now, The Chieftains tickets are known to sell out quickly, even with multiple shows. Get your tickets now at The Schermerhorn website.

March 11 – Introduction to Irish Sports with the NGAC

The NGAC will host a day of Irish sports for anyone who wants to join. Learning hurling and Gaelic football. If you love it, you can even join the club! Open to any and all over the age of 18, regardless of skill level or current athletic ability.

March 11 – Main Street Brewfest in Franklin

The 14th annual brewfest is a big part of Irish fun. Enjoy Celtic performers and Irish cheer as you sip on some of the best local and craft beer available. Tickets are required, and they sell out quickly. Get them here!

March 12-13 – The Final Days of Wolfe Tone at TPAC

This award-winning play tells the story of Ireland’s foremost rebel from the 1798 Irish rebellion. We’ll be giving tickets away to three lucky winners, but if you don’t want to take a chance on missing out, you can get tickets right now at the TPAC website.

March 14 – Traditional Irish Session at McNamara’s

Grab your instrument and join in as locals and guests play traditional music all evening. We gather there’ll be some room for dancing, too.

March 15 – Andrew Jackson’s 250th Birthday

Celebrate the 7th president’s Irish heritage at The Hermitage. The people of The Hermitage have been great friends to us over the past two years as we introduced hurling to the Highland Games. We reckon it’s because Old Hickory was Irish.

March 16 – Whiskey and Golf at the Sounds Stadium

Do you like whiskey? Do you like putt-putt golf? Then this is the evening for you! Just don’t party too hard on the course, because you have to save yourself for the big day!

March 17 – Party at McNamara’s

Enjoy a full day of Irish food, music, dancing, and fun at McNamara’s Irish Pub in Donelson. There’s a cover charge, so come prepared. The party lasts from 10 am to midnight. You’ll probably see a few of us there!

March 18-19 – Celtic Rhythms on Fire with the Nashville Irish Step Dancers

Enjoy beautiful and passionate Irish dance these two days during St. Patrick’s Day weekend. These tickets do sell quickly, so be sure to grab yours as soon as possible.

March 25 – Music City Invitational Tournament

Watch hurling, camogie, and maybe some Gaelic football as friends from clubs all over North America come to compete for the Music City Cup. The fun starts at 9 am and goes all day, including an after party. More info on that soon, so keep an eye on this page!

New events may crop up as plans are finalized. We’ll update with another post if that happens. For now, start marking your calendars so you can make it to everything!

 

**Edit 2/15 – The East Nashville St. Patrick’s Day Festival will not occur this year. It has been removed from the list. I know; we’ll miss it, too.

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NGAC to Host Intro to Hurling Session Aug 20

intro to hurling

After the wildly successful Intro to Gaelic Football session in July, the Nashville GAC decided to hold a similar training/workshop for anyone in Music City who may be interested in learning hurling and camogie. The intro session will take place on August 20 at 4 pm at Heartland Soccer Fields.

Anyone over the age of 18 is encouraged to join the fun. The club is a great way to get active, learn a new sport, and make new friends of all ages and fitness levels. Regardless of your athletic ability, you will get to play. Even the most experienced hurlers and camogs love to see new people come out to learn the sport, so you’ll have a warm reception, excellent instruction, and patient training.

As always, we’ll head over to Homegrown Taproom in Donelson to enjoy fellowship and #frostybevs. Make plans now to join us!

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NGAC Tours Nashville Parks to Introduce Hurling and Gaelic Football

NGAC park tour dates

The Nashville Gaelic Athletic Club (Nashville GAC), a co-ed Irish sports organization, is pleased to announce that the organization will tour four metro area parks during the month of August. The park tour is intended to bring awareness to the Irish sports of hurling, camogie, and Gaelic football.

Hurling, camogie, and Gaelic football are fast-paced, high-scoring field games. These sports, in addition to handball, are considered the national sports of Ireland, where they are predominantly played, but they’re also found in parts of the world where Irish immigrants settled. While many Americans have yet to discover these ancient games, which have been played for thousands of years, most are familiar with derivatives soccer, field hockey, and American football.

Each introductory session will take place on Thursday evenings at 6 pm. The dates and parks are as follows:

The Nashville club was founded in 2013 and has grown to include more than fifty members in a short time. Gaelic football was recently added to the club’s growing athletic offerings. It is the hope of all that anyone interested in Irish culture and unusual sports will discover the club and become a member.

Club membership is open to anyone over the age of eighteen (18), though plans for a youth organization are forthcoming. Any skill and fitness level are welcome; no experience with sports of any kind is required. The club furnishes all equipment for beginners, so interested parties should bring only athletic clothes and shoes, plenty of water, and excitement for a new sport. Express your interest on the Facebook event pages linked above.